LEAGUE SEMI-FINAL

Conor McManus (Monaghan) receives Man of the Match award Photo: Monaghan GAA

Conor McManus (Monaghan) receives Man of the Match award Photo: Monaghan GAA

Cork beat Donegal in the first semi-final  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Cork beat Donegal in the first semi-final Photo: © Michael Fisher

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Monaghan huddle before the throw-in Photo: © Michael Fisher

Monaghan huddle before the throw-in Photo: © Michael Fisher

Monaghan huddle before the throw-in Photo: © Michael Fisher

Monaghan huddle before the throw-in Photo: © Michael Fisher

Monaghan huddle before the throw-in Photo: © Michael Fisher

Monaghan huddle before the throw-in Photo: © Michael Fisher

View from the Lower Hogan Stand  Photo: © Michael Fisher

View from the Lower Hogan Stand Photo: © Michael Fisher

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A close call for the Dubs as valiant Monaghan go down by a single point in the National League semi-final at Croke Park 0-17 to 0-16. After last week’s drubbing by the Dubs at Clones, there weren’t too many supporters in the crowd of 20,000 expecting a Monaghan win. But as one friend from Emyvale said to me before the game, a defeat of around four points would be a good result for the Farneymen. In the end Monaghan almost managed a draw and a chance of taking victory in extra time. The Dubs however moved the ball quickly and precisely, launching wave upon wave of attacks on the Monaghan defence. But Monaghan kept with them all the way, up until the sixtieth minute when the sides were level on fourteen points each.

Monaghan huddle before the throw-in Photo: © Michael Fisher

Monaghan huddle before the throw-in Photo: © Michael Fisher

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HALF TIME: Dublin 0-09  Monaghan 0-07

(RTÉ Sport)

Dublin just about deserved their early advantage after a tense opening. Monaghan defended in numbers when Dublin attacked which was perhaps to be expected. Their last Croke Park clash with Dublin in the 2014 Championship ended in a 17-points battering. When the sides met in the final round of the league last weekend, Dublin were again double digit victors. So Monaghan regularly got 12 and 13 men behind the ball, often leaving McManus isolated in attack.

Malachy O’Rourke’s side did go forward in numbers when in possession, however, and picked off some fine points with an efficient display. Man-of-the-match Conor McManus was marked by David Byrne until the 52nd minute when Jonny Cooper was moved onto him. The Clontibret attacker gave Byrne a torrid time and scored six points off him. The ex-All Star escaped for two early points from play and another from a free after a foul on Owen Duffy. Kieran Hughes boomed over a beauty from distance too as did Neil McAdam while goalkeeper Rory Beggan nailed a free from all of 55 metres out.

Points came slightly easier to Dublin initially though and they also had a great goal chance when Cian O’Sullivan dragged a 30th minute shot wide. Dublin defender Philly McMahon strode forward for two points while Rock hit three points in the opening half, all from placed balls. Dubs rookie Brian Fenton closed out the first-half scoring and doubled his tally in the 42nd minute.

But Monaghan were the dominant force for much of the second-half and turned in a powerful display. McManus kicked three more scores from play in a row before Byrne was substituted. Dick Clerkin was excellent as a sub, scoring three points in all that helped Monaghan draw level at 0-13 each in the 55th minute. They remained tied with six minutes remaining but Dublin edged a tense finale thanks to those late points from Rock, O Conghaile and McCaffrey.

Dublin: S Cluxton, J Cooper, David Byrne, J McCaffrey (0-01), J Small, P McMahon (0-02), J McCarthy, D Bastick (0-01), C O’Sullivan, P Flynn (0-01), D Connolly, B Fenton (0-02), K McManamon (0-02), D Rock (0-07, 0-06f, 0-01 45), C Kilkenny.

Subs: MD Macauley for O’Sullivan, P Andrews for McManamon, D Daly for Byrne, E O Conghaile (0-01) for Bastick, C Costello for Fenton, T Brady for Flynn.

Monaghan: R Beggan (0-01, 0-01f), F Kelly, K Duffy, R Wylie, K O’Connell, V Corey, N McAdam (0-01), D Hughes, P Finlay (0-01, 0-01f); D Mone, K Hughes (0-02), T Kerr, R McAnespie, C McManus (0-08, 0-03f), O Duffy.

Subs: D Clerkin (0-03) for Kerr, D Malone for Duffy, S Gollogly for McAnespie, P McKenna for Finlay, D McKenna for O’Connell.

Referee: R Hickey (Clare).

Monaghan manager Malachy O’Rourke: “We’re pleased with a lot of aspects of our performance. We upped it in the second half. At 14-all we would have liked to go on and win it but that didn’t happen. We’ll take a lot of positives out of the league but we realise we still have a lot of work to do.”

Dublin manager Jim Gavin: “If we’re looking for positives, going down the stretch Monaghan looked in the ascendancy but our guys dug deep and found the scores. Some of our decision-making was poor but Monaghan were very impressive. The game could have gone either way.”

KATE BEAGAN EXHIBITION

Kate Beagan at the opening of her exhibition at the Doorway Gallery  Photo:  © Michael Fisher

Kate Beagan at the opening of her exhibition at the Doorway Gallery Photo: © Michael Fisher

‘I Came upon a Place’ is the title of Donaghmoyne artist Kate Beagan’s new solo exhibition in Dublin at the Doorway Gallery. Her beautiful landscapes can be seen there until. Thanks to Denise Donnelly and Deirdre Carroll for a successful opening night at South Frederick Street (not far from the Dáil, if you are visiting Dublin).

Kate Beagan at the opening of her exhibition at the Doorway Gallery  Photo:  © Michael Fisher

Kate Beagan at the opening of her exhibition at the Doorway Gallery Photo: © Michael Fisher

The Doorway Gallery is delighted to host an exhibition by Kate Beagan, opening  on Thursday April 9th between 6:00-7.30pm on 24 South Frederick Street. The exhibition will run until April 30th.

Painting by Kate Beagan  'Perbeach in Winter' €2,600.00 Photo:  © Michael Fisher

Painting by Kate Beagan ‘Perbeach in Winter’ €2,600.00 Photo: © Michael Fisher

I came upon a Place” is a new series of paintings by the artist Kate Beagan. Inspired by her surroundings in Co. Monaghan, Kate is drawn to the dramatic light cast upon the landscape and how ordinary subjects can become extraordinary when viewed through this light.

'After the Storm' by Kate Beagan €1800 at Doorway Gallery  Photo:  © Michael Fisher http://www.thedoorwaygallery.com/exhibition/kate-beagans-solo-show-i-came-upon-a-place/264/?sold=&offset=1

‘After the Storm’ by Kate Beagan €1800 at Doorway Gallery Photo: © Michael Fisher

In this collection, Kate captures the small winding roads of a county that is unspoilt and set apart from any other because of its drumlins.

Kate Beagan discusses her painting 'Shadows of an Old Life' with Joseph Murphy Dublin Photo:  © Michael Fisher

Kate Beagan discusses her painting ‘Shadows of an Old Life’ with Joseph Murphy Dublin Photo: © Michael Fisher

There are 28 works that can be viewed on the gallery’s website and purchased here.

Two paintings by Kate Beagan: (top) 'A Shaft of Light' and 'A Wet Morning'  Photo:  © Michael Fisher

Two paintings by Kate Beagan: (top) ‘A Shaft of Light’ and ‘A Wet Morning’ Photo: © Michael Fisher

Layering the canvas with smooth and confident strokes she paints with various brushes and homemade scrapers in a style that is loose and fresh.

Doorway Gallery owners Deirdre Carroll and Denise Donnelly with Kate Beagan's painting 'Reflection'  Photo:  © Michael Fisher

Doorway Gallery owners Deirdre Carroll and Denise Donnelly with Kate Beagan’s painting ‘Reflection’ Photo: © Michael Fisher

MONAGHAN IN DUBLIN

Kate Beagan exhibition at Doorway Gallery Photo:  © Michael Fisher

Kate Beagan exhibition at Doorway Gallery Photo: © Michael Fisher

As the capital prepares for a Monaghan invasion for the return match against the Dubs at Croke Park on Sunday in the National League football semi-final, tonight (Thursday) was also an important (and busy) night for Monaghan folk in Dublin in the arts world. Donaghmoyne artist Kate Beagan was launching a new exhibition of her paintings “I Came Upon A Place” in the Doorway Gallery at South Frederick Street. thoseaprilfeversforwebMary O’Donnell from Monaghan town was celebrating the publication of a new collection of poetry, “Those April Fevers” by Arc Publications. There were many familiar faces in the Benedict Kiely room at the Irish Writers Centre in Parnell Square, including several supporters of the William Carleton summer school such as poets Maurice Harmon and Iggy McGovern.

Mary O'Donnell  Photo:  © Michael Fisher

Mary O’Donnell Photo: © Michael Fisher

FERNHILL HOUSE

Fernhill House and Gardens Photo: Colliers/daft.ie

Fernhill House and Gardens Photo: Colliers/daft.ie

Fernhill House and estate has been sold. But it’s not the one in the Glencairn area of West Belfast that used to house a Peoples Museum with loyalist memorabilia. The one I am referring to is in South County Dublin, between Sandyford and Stepaside. I have passed it on a number of occasions in the past two months, but I never realised what was behind the long stone wall along the Enniskerry Road, opposite Belarmine.

The Irish Times reports that the house and gardens have been sold for €4.25m to Dún Laoghaire Rathdown Council. A council spokesman said it was planned to redevelop the 84-acres site as a regional public park in the coming years. The property was bought by developer David Arnold for around €45 million in 2008 and later taken over by the assets management agency NAMA. It went on the market in April through Colliers at a guide price of €5 million.

Fernhill Gardens site Photo: Colliers/daft.ie

Fernhill Gardens site Photo: Colliers/daft.ie

Council chairwoman Marie Baker said the acquisition was one of the last opportunities for the council to buy a “sizeable parcel of land” to be used for recreational purposes. Fernhill gardens were started in the early 19th century and have rare collections of plants, trees and shrubs. About 45 acres of the land is wooded. The property was owned by the Walker family from 1934 onwards. The house was initially built in 1723.

Fernhill House and Gardens Photo: Colliers/daft.ie

Fernhill House and Gardens Photo: Colliers/daft.ie

According to estate agents Colliers International, the Darley Family, are credited with most of the changes that the house has been through. The original section of the house is the single storey section to the front which now contains the principle reception rooms. The structure to the rear is believed to have been a range of outbuildings which were converted and extended to living accommodation, probably by Edmond or Justice William Darley.

 

HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DUBLIN

Auschwitz camp entrance  Photo:  © Michael Fisher

Auschwitz camp entrance Photo: © Michael Fisher

Last year I wrote about the Holocaust Day service in Northern Ireland. There is also an annual service in Dublin on the nearest Sunday to January 27th. It is organised by the Holocaust Education Trust Ireland. The event honours the memory of all of the victims of the Holocaust — six million Jews as well as over five million other victims – persecuted because of their nationality, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, religious beliefs or political affiliations. The inclusion of all of the victim groups is essential to the commemoration, highlighting the importance of education about anti-Semitism and all forms of intolerance.

Auschwitz memorial  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Auschwitz memorial Photo: © Michael Fisher

The Holocaust Memorial Day commemoration demonstrates the Irish Government’s commitment to the Declaration of Stockholm, 2000, when the 44 signatory countries undertook to commemorate and teach about the Holocaust every year. Holocaust Education Trust Ireland advises and assists Government with organising the annual Holocaust Memorial Day commemoration.

Rail tracks at Birkenau camp Photo:  © Michael Fisher

Rail tracks at Birkenau camp Photo: © Michael Fisher

The commemoration is held in the Round Room of the Mansion House and admission is by invitation from the Holocaust Education Trust.

CHRISTMAS SHOPPING

Belvedere College students collecting in Grafton Street  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Belvedere College students collecting for homeless in Grafton Street   Photo: © Michael Fisher

For the past thirty years, staff and students from Belvedere College SJ in Dublin have been doing something very different at Christmas, amidst all the glitz and glamour of the annual retail fest. They hold a sponsored sleep-out on O’Connell Street in aid of the Peter McVerry Trust for the homeless and other charities such as Focus Ireland. As well as dropping some money in the buckets in O’Connell St, this year people can also donate using a text service. By texting ‘Sleepout’ to 57802, people will be donating a minimum of €1.60 for the price of a €2 text.

Belvedere College students among the crowds in Grafton Street Dublin  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Belvedere College students among the crowds in Grafton Street Dublin Photo: © Michael Fisher

Some of the students and their teachers also decide to fast for a period of the sleep-out. It is an integral part of the College’s commitment to social justice and the participants each year have become a familiar sight for passers-by on Dublin’s main street. Staff and pupils have raised well over €120,000 in recent years.

Collecting on Grafton Street for the homeless  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Collecting on Grafton Street for the homeless Photo: © Michael Fisher

I saw recently that in a similar exercise to raise awareness about the problem of homelessness, students at my former school Wimbledon College SJ spent a night in sleeping bags in the playground in a sponsored sleep-out. I can remember passing through Waterloo station on many occasions and seeing what became a ‘cardboard city’ in one of the underpasses near Waterloo bridge where homeless people slept rough. Now the problem has again become more acute in Dublin.

Belvedere College SJ  Sleepout 2013

Belvedere College SJ Sleepout 2013

BRENDAN BEHAN

Brendan Behan's typewriter & NUJ Card: Photo: Dublin Writers Museum

Brendan Behan’s typewriter & NUJ Card: Photo: Dublin Writers Museum

Brendan Behan’s NUJ card and Remington portable no.2 typewriter along with a first edition of ‘The Quare Fellow’ (1954) are on display at the Dublin Writers Museum in Parnell Square. His membership of the union was discussed during a tour by an NUJ group of the graves of writers and other famous people at Glasnevin cemetery in Dublin on Sunday.

Tour Guide Paddy Gleeson points out Brendan Behan's Grave  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Tour Guide Paddy Gleeson points out Brendan Behan’s Grave Photo: © Michael Fisher

I am told that Joe Jennings (later CIÉ Press Officer) was his proposer when Behan started writing a weekly column and joined The Irish Press chapel in 1954. I also know that when my father was London Editor of The Irish Press (1954-1962), the playwright had called into the Fleet Street office, probably looking for an advance of some sort.

Plaque on Behan's Grave  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Plaque on Behan’s Grave Photo: © Michael Fisher

In May 1956, The Quare Fellow’ opened at the Theatre Royal Stratford East, in a production by Joan Littlewood’s Theatre Workshop. The play later transferred to the West End. Behan died on March 20th 1964, aged 41.

Adrian Dunbar in 'Brendan at the Chelsea'  Photo: Lyric Theatre

Adrian Dunbar in ‘Brendan at the Chelsea’ Photo: Lyric Theatre

In May 2011, a play called ‘Brendan at the Chelsea’, written by Behan’s niece, Janet Behan, was the first work to be performed in the Naughton Studio at the new Lyric Theatre in Belfast. The production tells the story of Behan’s residence at New York’s Hotel Chelsea in 1963. It was a critical success and was revived for a tour to the Acorn Theatre in New York in September, before returning to the Lyric in October. Again, it received favourable reviews.

“In Adrian Dunbar’s riveting central performance, Behan plays the stage Irishman to perfection, a song permanently on his lips, his slurring, alcohol-soaked wit delighting a succession of hangers-on with its scathing, self-deprecating observations.” (‘The Stage’)

Brendan Behan's Grave  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Brendan Behan’s Grave Photo: © Michael Fisher

Starting tonight, the play has moved to the Project Arts Centre in Behan’s native Dublin and will run for five nights until Saturday. More information can be found here.

Adrian Dunbar plays Brendan Behan in this warm and funny drama of an Irish national treasure. It is 1960s New York in the legendary bohemian bolt hole, The Chelsea Hotel. Arthur Miller is just across the hall and the symphony of 24th Street is rising up and in through the open window of Brendan Behan’s room. He is broke, hung over and way past the delivery date of his latest book, the first line of which he is yet to write. He was told to stop drinking or he’d be dead in six months – that was two years ago. Today is not going well. His mistress keeps ringing, the bills aren’t paid and a wire arrives from Dublin with the kind of news that’s guaranteed to put his blood pressure through the roof…

Adrian Dunbar (who sings a song in Irish) and Janice Behan were interviewed on the John Murray Show this morning on RTÉ Radio 1.

Brendan Behan    Source: John Murray Show website

Brendan Behan Source: John Murray Show website

GLASNEVIN: REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY

Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin 11am   Photo: © Michael Fisher

Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin 11am Photo: © Michael Fisher

At 11am on Remembrance Sunday our group was gathering at the entrance to Glasnevin cemetery in Dublin for a tour of graves. One of the first I noticed was the memorial to Irishmen who had served as British soldiers in the Great War and the Second World War. The monument had been restored in 2011 by the Commonwealth Graves Commission. The Royal British Legion had placed a wreath there and on Monday there will be special ceremonies taking place on the 11th hour of the 11th day of November, with a number of VIPs expected to attend.

WEB SUMMIT CHATS

Web Summit Main Stage  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Web Summit Main Stage Photo: © Michael Fisher

It was all very high-tech as around 10,000 visitors gathered in Dublin for the Web Summit at the RDS. Another 600 were at an IATA travel conference in the National Conference Centre. So imagine how the restaurants, pubs and similar businesses that open late to cater for guests felt when they were faced with overnight water restrictions amounting to a cut in supply between 8pm and 7am.

It’s because the infrastructure in place is old and needs to be replaced. Dublin City Council says that the extent of the leakage is largely owing to the age of the network, with an estimated 1200 kilometres of the network being over 50 years old. In addition to this demand can rise during a cold spell if taps are left running in an effort to prevent frozen pipes. The normal demand for water in the Dublin Region is 540 million litres per day. However during a cold spell demand can increase to a staggering 636 million litres. This means that the treated reservoirs such as the one at Ballymore Eustace in County Wicklow empty at a much faster rate than they can fill, which leads to a depletion of treated water storage reserves.

Anyway the main problem for delegates at the RDS appeared to be the breakdown in the wifi system upon which each visitor is so dependent to do business. It seems to have crashed temporarily owing to the large numbers attempting to sign in. Despite these difficulties, I’m sure plenty of networking was done and new contacts were made with potential investors for startups.

Invest Northern Ireland stand at Web Summit in RDS  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Invest Northern Ireland stand at Web Summit in RDS Photo: © Michael Fisher

One of the stands I visited was that of Invest Northern Ireland. Another was representing Berlin as a city to do business.

WEB SUMMIT BUSINESS

Web Summit, RDS  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Web Summit, RDS Photo: © Michael Fisher

The main hall at the RDS complex in Dublin was a hive of activity during the Web Summit. Presentations being made on various stages. I immediately noticed the stands of some major players in the world of business: Microsoft, PayPal, Verizon, Bing and a host of others including media players such as the Irish Times and RTÉ. But walking through to the next hall is where I found the real activity and what I thought was the most interesting part of the event.

Presentations at the Web Summit  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Presentations in the Startup Village Photo: © Michael Fisher

This was the Alpha Startup Village. No large stands as in traditional exhibitions. Instead, each exhibitor was standing beside a board which had a poster with the name and some details of the company and on the wooden shelf underneath, there was room for one laptop. This is where new companies are born and bred. These exhibitors are young entrepreneurs all with different apps to promote and looking for investment. Much of their time here is spent networking and when two of them separately stopped me for a chat (seeing my media badge), I was happy to speak to both companies about their stories.

Gaylord Roukine of ilooove.it  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Gaylord Roukine of ilooove.it Photo: © Michael Fisher

Interested in mountain climbing? Then Gaylord Loukine from Namur in Belgium has just the app for you: http://climbing.ilooove.it/ is designed to help climbers around the world to share their passion for the sport, to discover new spots for climbing and also to make new friends in what they hope is an inspiring way.

Bastien Sannac of meludia.com   Photo: © Michael Fisher

Bastien Sannac of meludia.com Photo: © Michael Fisher

The other app I was introduced to promises a new perspective to help you understand music. Bastien Sannac is the founder of http://www.meludia.com/login which employs twelve people and is based in Paris.